Siren’s call

By: pelly*made

May 09 2013

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Category: Archives, photos

5 Comments

Aperture:f/3.4
Focal Length:7.6mm
ISO:100
Shutter:1/900 sec
Camera:HP PhotoSmart C945 (V01.74)

wiki: in Greek mythology, the Sirens (Greek plural: Σειρῆνες Seirēnes) were dangerous and beautiful creatures, portrayed as femmes fatales who lured nearby sailors with their enchanting music and voices to shipwreck on the rocky coast of their island. They were considered the daughters of the river god Achelous, fathered upon Terpsichore, Melpomene, Sterope, or Chthon (the Earth)

Their number is variously reported as between two and five. In the Odyssey, Homer says nothing of their origin or names, but gives the number of the Sirens as two. Later writers mention both their names and number: some state that there were three, Peisinoe, Aglaope, and Thelxiepeia,  or Parthenope, Ligeia, and Leucosia. Eustathius states that they were two, Aglaopheme and Thelxiepeia.

The Sirens might be called the Muses of the lower world. Their song is continually calling on Persephone. The term “siren song” refers to an appeal that is hard to resist but that, if heeded, will lead to a bad conclusion

As Jane Ellen Harrison notes of “The Ker as siren“: “It is strange and beautiful that Homer should make the Sirens appeal to the spirit, not to the flesh… They are mantic creatures like the Sphinx with whom they have much in common, knowing both the past and the future,” Harrison observed. “Their song takes effect at midday, in a windless calm. The end of that song is death

Sirens combine women and birds in various ways. In early Greek art Sirens were represented as birds with large women’s heads, bird feathers and scaly feet, playing a variety of musical instruments, especially harps. Birds were chosen because of their beautiful voices. Later Sirens were sometimes depicted as beautiful women, whose bodies, not only their voices, are seductive

5 comments on “Siren’s call”

  1. I’m sure many of sirens have wrecked ships in a lot of Greek mythology.

  2. […] post came about when I was visiting Pelly‘s post Siren’s call . While chatting to her about her unique style of photography I remarked on her toes. Well, blow me […]


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