Apollo

By: pelly*made

Feb 06 2013

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Category: Archives, photos

2 Comments

Aperture:f/3
Focal Length:27.85mm
ISO:200
Shutter:1/9 sec
Camera:HP PhotoSmart C945 (V01.74)

Part of a “chryselephantine” statue (gold and ivory). It is believed to be a gift from king Kroisos to Delphi and presumed to be Apollo. It was burned in a fire. He holds a shallow offering-bowl. The enigmatic smile is typical of the Archaic period of Greek art and was made in Ionia the 6th c BC.

wiki: chryselephantine statues were not only visually striking, they also displayed the wealth and cultural achievements of those who constructed them or financed their construction. The creation of such a statue involved skills in sculpture, carpentry, jewellery, and ivory carving. Once completed, the statues required constant maintenance. It is known that at Olympia, skilled personnel were employed to ensure the upkeep of the statue

Delphi became the site of a major temple to Phoebus Apollo, as well as the Pythian Games and the famous prehistoric oracle. Even in Roman times, hundreds of votive statues remained

Carved into the temple were three phrases: “γνῶθι σεαυτόν” = “know thyself”, “μηδέν άγαν” = “nothing in excess” and ” Ἑγγύα πάρα δ’ἄτη” = “make a pledge and mischief is nigh”

In Greek mythology, Apollo’s oracle in Delphi was the most important oracle and a major site for his worship after he slew the Python, a dragon who lived there and protected the navel of the Earth

Apollo spoke through the sibyl or priestess of the oracle. She was known as the Pythia. She sat on a tripod seat over an opening in the earth. When Apollo slew Python, its body fell into this fissure, according to legend, and fumes arose from its decomposing body. Intoxicated by the vapors, the sibyl would fall into a trance, allowing Apollo to possess her spirit. In this state she prophesied…

More about Delphi and the museum:

http://ancient-greece.org/museum/muse-delphi.html

 

 

2 comments on “Apollo”

  1. What an amazing statue. I love that you shared its history, too

    • It is breathtaking… Maybe you could check another post named “Stepmother” using my search button. It is also a chryselephantine statue from Delphi :)


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